1857 US Postage Stamps 5 US 1857 Scotts - US Postage Stamps 5A 1857 Scotts - US Postage Stamps 6 1857 Scotts - US Postage Stamps 6b 1857 Scotts - US Postage Stamps 7 1857 Scotts - US Postage Stamps 8 1857 Scotts - US Postage Stamps 8A 1857 Scotts - US Postage Stamps 9 1857 Scotts - US Postage Stamps 1857 US Postage Stamp Essays

1857 3¢ - #25
Four outer frame lines

scott #25
3¢ - Rose red or dull red - Type I
Four outer frame lines.
38,000,000 - Perf. 15½ - Scott #25 - 1857


3¢ - Rose - Type I
Four outer frame lines.
Perf. 15½ Imperf Vertically - Scott #25A- 1857
CERTIFICATE REQUIRED! to discern from #25

Value

(with 4 margins around the design)
Used: $8-$35
No postmark with gum (MH): $200-$400
Full perfect gum, no postmark, no trace of stamp hinge mark (MNH): $2,500

Issued: February 28, 1857

Plate Size: Sheets of 200 subjects (2 panes of 100).

Printer: Toppan, Carpenter & Co., using the flat plate printing process.

Watermark: None

Quantity Issued: 39 million

Color: ROSE

Note: Because of the narrow margins, finding an example with a complete design can be a challenge. One can usually see one frame line, either at the top or bottom of the design.

25 cover
Largest known used multiple


Cover mailed on the first day of the Civil War
From Beaufort, SC, to Savannah, GA
Feb 4th, 1861

The Inspiration for the Design


George Washington
Jean-Antoine Houdon (1741-1828)
Marble, 25" high
Mount Vernon, Virginia

The design was based off Jean-Antoine Houdon's bust, for more detail on the bust click here.

Houdin - George Washington Scotts - US Postage Stamps
The painting shows the studio of French sculptor Jean-Antoine Houdon with Houdon working on a bust.

Varieties to look for

THE CHICAGO PERFORATION


Jerome S. Wagshal established a connection between the "Sample A" Chicago Perf. 11 stamps and the effort by R. K. Swift to sell the Hadley perforator to the U.S. Post Office Department in June 1855. W. Wilson Hulme II went into greater detail identifying the various known examples by their respective positions in the sheet and establishing that the ex-Chase block of 21 (since divided into smaller units) and two blocks of six originated from the same "Sample A" sheet, which Swift submitted to the Third Assistant Postmaster with his solicitation letter. These "Sample A" stamps later reached collectors.

A total of 33 "Sample A" Chicago Perf. stamps are recorded, including a block of nine, two blocks of six, and a block of four. There are four contiguous stamps from the Chase piece that have not been accounted for and may still exist as a block.

Jerome S. Wagshal established a connection between the "Sample A" Chicago Perf. 11 stamps and the effort by R. K. Swift to sell the Hadley

THE FORKED LIGHTNING CRACK

Whilst not as well known as the forked lightning crack on plate 3 of the 1857 1¢, this plate crack (at upper left) does command a premium in price.

HORIZONTAL IMPERF


Extremely rare and not cataloged by Scotts. Last seen at an auction in 1973.

How the perforated stamp came to us

Prince Consort Essay
The Prince Consort essay

When Rowland Hill designed the worlds first postage stamp, the penny black, no provision was made for separating the stamps. in 1847, six years after the introduction of the first stamp, Henry Archer submitted a two seperating machines to the British postmaster general. These machines employed lancet shaped blades, however their effect, was mixed at best. Soon after Mr Archer patented a machine which used perforation as a means of seperation, his first trials with this machine were on the Prince Consort essay, an example is seen above. The Prince Consort was Prince Albert, the design was never approved.

1853 revenue stamp
1853 One penny receipt stamp
Worlds first perforated stamp

Prince Consort Essay
1854 Penny Red
Worlds first perforated postage stamp

In October 1853 the first perforated stamps were issued in the UK using new perforating machines built by David Napier and Son Ltd, they were revenue stamps The first perforated stamps were revenue stamps issued in October 1853.

Aaron Brown

Aaron Brown, Postmaster-General 1857-59

In 1857 the new postmaster general was determined to introduce the perforation of postage stamps to the US. Perforating machines, at the cost of $3,000 were acquired by Toppan Carpenter, along with $6,000 in new plates. The machines were from England, but not from Napier, they purchased rouletting machines from William Bemrose & Sons of Derby, converting them to perforating machines. One problem is that these new machines could accommodate a relatively narrow sheet, which explains why the stamps of the 1857 series are spaced so close together. The first stamps to be perforated were the thirty cent, twenty four cent and ninety cent values.

1857 US Postage Stamps 5 US 1857 Scotts - US Postage Stamps 5A 1857 Scotts - US Postage Stamps 6 1857 Scotts - US Postage Stamps 6b 1857 Scotts - US Postage Stamps 7 1857 Scotts - US Postage Stamps 8 1857 Scotts - US Postage Stamps 8A 1857 Scotts - US Postage Stamps 9 1857 Scotts - US Postage Stamps 1857 US Postage Stamp Essays