George Washington (biography)
2¢ - Red, light red or deep red - Type IV
Scott #279B - Double line USPS wmk. - 1897
Horizontal lines run through upper triangles
but not through the double white lines that border the triangles

Value
Used: Worthless
No postmark with gum (MH): $1-$3
Full perfect gum, no postmark, no trace of stamp hinge mark (MNH): $7-$15




279 will have triangles in the top corners,
the triangles have a white border.


Toga button elongated


Additional dots on ear


"T" of "TWO"
Inner right edge straight


Re-cutting and lengthening of hairline



Inner line of left ornament less well defined

Used stamps sell for less than $1


2¢ - Rose Carmine - Type IV
Shaded toga button, additional dots on ear, "T" of "TWO"
straight at right, re-cutting and lengthening of hairline

Scott #279Bc - Double line USPS wmk. - 1897
Note: This stamp is often mis-identified, it is scarce!
Certificate required

2¢ - Orange Red - Type IV
Shaded toga button, additional dots on ear, "T" of "TWO"
straight at right, re-cutting and lengthening of hairline

Scott #279Bd - Double line USPS wmk. - 1897
Note: This stamp is often mis-identified, it is scarce!
Certificate required


2¢ - Rose Carmine - Type IV
Shaded toga button, additional dots on ear, "T" of "TWO"
straight at right, re-cutting and lengthening of hairline

Booklet of Six
Scott #279Be - Double line USPS wmk. - 1897

2¢ - CARMINE - Type IV
Shaded toga button, additional dots on ear, "T" of "TWO"
straight at right, re-cutting and lengthening of hairline

Scott #279Bf - Double line USPS wmk. - 1897
Note: This stamp is often mis-identified, it is scarce!
Certificate required


2¢ - Vermilion - Type IV
Shaded toga button, additional dots on ear, "T" of "TWO"
straight at right, re-cutting and lengthening of hairline

Booklet of Six
Scott #279Bh - Double line USPS wmk. - 1897



2¢ - Orange-Red- Type IV
toga button, additional dots on ear, "T" of "TWO"
straight at right, re-cutting and lengthening of hairline

Booklet of Six
Scott #279bj - Double line USPS wmk. - 189

279bj us stamps
BK1 - contained two panes of six of 289bj

2¢ - Red - Type IV
toga button, additional dots on ear, "T" of "TWO"
straight at right, re-cutting and lengthening of hairline

Booklet of Six
Scott #279bk - Double line USPS wmk. - 1897

Issued: November 18th, 1897, earliest recorded example November 18th, 1897.
This stamp was also the first to be used in booklets, being introduced in this form on April 2nd, 1900.
Plate Size: Sheets of 400 subjects (4 panes of 100)
Printer: The Bureau of Printing and Engraving
Quantity Issued: Twelve billion.

The Post Office report from 1899 supplies one with almost every detail you would wish to know
about this stamp, and every other stamp in this series. The level of detail is amazing. Click here for more on this report.

The stamps were watermarked USPS and part of one of the three letters will be visible
(sometimes barely so) when immersing the stamp in watermark fluid
using a simple black watermark tray. By the way, you really have to believe
you have got a valuable stamp before investing the $20 it costs to buy the afore mentioned items. You could use the cheaper alternative,
Ronosol Lighter fluid, however, unlike watermark fluid, it is highly inflammable and dangerous to use, plus it stinks the house up.

Introduced in April 2nd, 1900, the stamp booklet was the brain child
of the second assistant postmaster, it was immiediately popular.

Whilst on the subject of booklets, there has only been one recorded instance of the plate number on a booklet pane.
Sold in 2002 by Robert Siegal auctions, it sold for the lofty price of $2,600.

A rare printing error, by the time this series was issued the bureau had got the art of printing stamps down.

The design was taken from the portrait bust of Washington by Jean Antoine Houdon.
The busts are now at Mount Vernon.

There is one major variety, not mentioned by Scotts but seen fairly often, that being the
design without any lines in the right hand traingle. as seen above. The flaw was due to plate
#783 being worn. The retail of this is about $100,

"Specimen" Ovpt. Ty. E (279BjS-E)

Large Die Proof on Card
Carmine
279-BfP1

1900 Mercury

There was no 3¢ value issued in the 1898 series, there
being no need to as the color of the existing 3¢ was markedly different
to the other values and it's color complied with UPU
regulations. However the bureau did toy with the idea
of a new 3¢ design. Above is an example of an essay for a new 3¢
is this Mercury essay, created in 1900 by the American Bank Note Co.