1932 US Postage Stamps 726 US Postage Stamps 727 US Postage Stamps 728 US Postage Stamps 729 US Postage Stamps 730 US Postage Stamps 731 US Postage Stamps 732 US Postage Stamps 733 US Postage Stamps 734 US Postage Stamps 735 US Postage Stamps US Postage Stamp values US Postage Stamps prices

1933 3¢ Byrd Expedition Souvenir Sheet #735

735 Scotts - US Postage Stamps
Map of the world showing Byrd's Expeditions
Issued for the National Stamp Exhibition

3¢ Dark Blue
Flat Plate Printing - Souvenir Sheet - No gum
300,000 - Scott #735 - 1933

Value for the sheet of 6 (as shown above)
Used: $4-$10
No postmark with gum (MH): $2-$5
Full perfect gum, no postmark, no trace of stamp hinge mark (MNH): $4-$13

Value for a single stamp (as shown below)
Used: $0.50-$0.75
No postmark with gum (MH): $0.50-$0.75
Full perfect gum, no postmark, no trace of stamp hinge mark (MNH): $1-$2

735 US stamps

3c - Dark Blue
Single from Souvenir Sheets
Flat Plate Printing - Imperf
Scott #735a- 1933

A margin of at least 18mm (gutter distance between stamps
in printed panes) must be present to distinguish this stamp from the regular printing

The story behind the stamp

This stamp was issued for the interest of philatelists, and was not
widely on sale to the general public. The design was sketched out by one of the most
well known of all philatelists, President Franklin Delano Roosevelt



President Roosevelt's sketch for the stamp. Signed by him

The stamp was issued to celebrate Admiral Byrd's second Antartic
expedition and as you can see from Roosevelts sketch it shows Byrd's previous
expeditions marked on the globe. Roosevelt drew this sketch in an attempt to
illustrate to the post office what he was looking for, the two designs that the post
office had submitted did not please him




The Post Offices original designs for the stamp (733-E)



The new design based on Roosevelt's sketch, the 25¢ value was later changed to 3¢.
The size and shape of the stamp was the same as the special delivery stamp but in vertical
format. This shape and size was to be used by the post office all the way up to the 1970's

Little America (shown on the map on the stamps design) was the name
given to Admiral Byrd's base camp. A post office special representative, Charles F. Anderson
was sent with five bags of mail to the camp, by ship, and dog sled, with the purpose of
cancelling the letters in the mail bag and sending them back to the US. The letters in the
bag were all from philatelists who had paid for this priveledge. Unfortunately the extreme
cold made the cancelling ink difficult to use, conditions were cramped and there was no storage,
plus it was difficult to keep the letters dry. Through sleeping only 18 hours in 16 days Anderson
was able to complete the task. A further five mail bags arrived and the same procedure was
repeated on a second cancellation.



The tent which served as the post office at the base camp, the little tent housed the mail bags.



Inside the tent, note the bundles of mail awaiting a cancellation lying on the desk in the foreground.
The cancelling device is in front of Andersons (L) hands

First day cover for #733 dated October 9th, 1933

Map of Byrds Expedition

1932 US Postage Stamps 726 US Postage Stamps 727 US Postage Stamps 728 US Postage Stamps 729 US Postage Stamps 730 US Postage Stamps 731 US Postage Stamps 732 US Postage Stamps 733 US Postage Stamps 734 US Postage Stamps 735 US Postage Stamps US Postage Stamp values US Postage Stamps prices